Skip to content

2021 Vermont 100 Cancellation Notice

2021 Vermont 100 – Cancellation Notice

2021 Vermont 100 – Cancellation Notice

From the Race Director – Updated 4/28/21

It’s with a heavy heart that the Vermont 100 Endurance Race committee voted last week to officially cancel the 2021 Vermont 100 due to COVID-19. This was an emotional decision and not one that was taken lightly or decided easily.

The race committee considered the health and safety of all runners, riders, volunteers, community members, and vendors at the forefront of the discussion.  We did look at many alternatives, including the route, timing of events, and alteration of the services provided, to consider if there was a feasible alternative.  However, we jointly were not able to find a way to provide anything close to the true Vermont 100 experience and felt like continuing with a stripped-down, much smaller, and incredibly altered version of the event was not the experience that we wanted for the participants, volunteers, or community members.  As said before, this was not an easy decision and ultimately was extremely emotional for all.

We truly look forward to 2022, when we are committed to providing the magical celebration and amazing atmosphere that is Vermont 100 and hope to see each of you there!

We acknowledge that the current situation is very fluid, making day-to-day and month-to-month planning difficult for everyone. We felt it was important to share this information with everyone involved as quickly as possible so you each can adjust plans accordingly.  We are now working on many of the unknowns (and questions) that you will have, and ask for your patience and understanding as we shift our focus to that.

Details we can share right now

  • 2021 Start List
    We plan to roll the 2020 start list over into the 2022 Vermont 100. If you do not want to remain on the start list for next year’s event, you can request removal from the start list using this form (https://forms.gle/8wrAVeigTRtRKWwU7).
  • 2021 Waitlist
    We plan to roll the 2020 waitlist over into the 2021 Vermont 100. We WILL NOT pull anyone off the waitlist and into the event until a later date (likely next fall/winter). If you do not want to remain on the waitlist for next year’s event, you can request removal from the waitlist using this form (https://forms.gle/8wrAVeigTRtRKWwU7)
  • Race Qualifiers / Volunteer Requirements
    We have not made any decisions regarding any adjustments to the volunteer and qualifier requirements for next year’s race (given this year’s race cancellation). We will communicate when we know more.
  • 2022 Race Date
    TBD

Further details coming soon

As we find time in the coming weeks to work out the finer details regarding this cancellation, we will release more information. We appreciate your patience, understanding, and support through these uncertain times.

Virtual Run (#myVT100)

There are a few options for anyone who wishes to still celebrate VT100, support Vermont Adaptive, or both!

  • For folks who want to celebrate VT100 in their own way: We will be again challenging folks to choose their own adventure regarding how they celebrate what is meaningful for them, and share their story, photos, inspiration via #myVT100.  (This will run for the entire month of July.)
  • For folks who want to celebrate VT100 while also supporting Vermont Adaptive: Again, folks who participate in #myVT100 and fundraise for Vermont Adaptive will be awarded some VT100 goodies. More details on this will be coming soon.
  • For folks who simply want to fundraise for Vermont Adaptive: You’re encouraged to check out the Vermont Adaptive Charity Challenge. More information is available here (charityride.vermontadaptive.org).

The impact on Vermont Adaptive & Local Businesses

I want to take a moment to acknowledge that while I’m bummed to not see you all this summer, the race cancellation will also have a significant impact on others – notably, Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports, as well as the area businesses of West Windsor. And for the 2nd year in a row!

This race is annually one of the largest fundraisers for Vermont Adaptive. Their mission, providing the opportunity for athletes of all abilities to enjoy activities and challenge themselves through sports, is one that we can all agree is important right now. I know how much running has become my sanity through COVID-19; and I know that without Vermont Adaptive, countless folks don’t have the option to go out and run or otherwise work out their anxiety through sports.

Further, our event is one of the largest sources of income for many various West Windsor businesses, which will struggle financially with the cancellation of the 2020 and 2021 VT100 (among other events, such as the 2020 VT50 that also supports these businesses).

As such, I know some runners may wish to donate some or all of their 2020 entry fee towards Vermont Adaptive and/or towards supporting a local West Windsor business. If you wish to do this, you may make your donation using this form (https://forms.gle/Mons5SQKf11g4EVEA). And don’t worry, unless you choose to remove your name from the start list, your spot will still be carried over to the 2022 Vermont 100. If you wish to make a donation to Vermont Adaptive (and support me running 100 miles on my own this summer, again), you may also do so here (http://www.PledgeReg.com/288835).

Thank you and rock on

More than ever, we look forward to seeing you at Silver Hill for the 2022 Vermont 100! Until then, stay safe and be well!

–  Amy Rusiecki and the Vermont 100 Race Committee

« Back to all posts
2020 Vermont 100 – Cancellation Notice

2020 Vermont 100 – Cancellation Notice

From the Race Director – Updated 4/15/20

It’s with a heavy heart that the Vermont 100 Endurance Race committee voted last night (4/14/20) to officially cancel the 2020 Vermont 100 due to COVID-19. This was an emotional decision, but one we made with the health and safety of all runners, riders, volunteers, community members, and vendors at the forefront of the discussion.

We acknowledge that the current situation is very fluid, making day-to-day and month-to-month planning difficult for everyone.  We felt it was important to share this information with everyone involved as quickly as possible so you each can adjust plans accordingly.  We are now working on many of the unknowns (and questions) that you will have, and ask for your patience and understanding as we shift our focus to that.

Details we can share right now

  • 2020 Start List
    We plan to roll the 2020 start list over into the 2021 Vermont 100. If you do not want to remain on the start list for next year’s event, you can request removal from the start list using this form (https://forms.gle/8wrAVeigTRtRKWwU7).
  • 2020 Waitlist
    We plan to roll the 2020 waitlist over into the 2021 Vermont 100. We WILL NOT pull anyone off the waitlist and into the event until a later date (likely next fall/winter). If you do not want to remain on the waitlist for next year’s event, you can request removal from the waitlist using this form (https://forms.gle/8wrAVeigTRtRKWwU7)
  • Race Qualifiers / Volunteer Requirements
    We have not made any decisions regarding any adjustments to the volunteer and qualifier requirements for next year’s race (given this year’s race cancellation). We will communicate when we know more.
  • 2021 Race Date
    Please mark your calendars for July 16-18th, 2021

Further details coming soon

As we find time in the coming weeks to work out the finer details regarding this cancellation, we will release more information. We appreciate your patience, understanding, and support through these uncertain times.

The impact on Vermont Adaptive & Local Businesses

I want to take a moment to acknowledge that while I’m bummed to not see you all this summer, the race cancellation will also have a significant impact on others – notably, Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports, as well as the area businesses of West Windsor.

This race is annually one of the largest fundraisers for Vermont Adaptive. Their mission, providing the opportunity for athletes of all abilities to enjoy activities and challenge themselves through sports, is one that we can all agree is important right now. I know how much running has become my sanity through COVID-19; and I know that without Vermont Adaptive, countless folks don’t have the option to go out and run or otherwise work out their anxiety through sports.

Further, our event is one of the largest sources of income for many various West Windsor businesses, which will struggle financially with the cancellation of the 2020 VT100.

As such, I know some runners may wish to donate some or all of their 2020 entry fee towards Vermont Adaptive and/or towards supporting a local West Windsor business. If you wish to do this, you may make your donation using this form (https://forms.gle/Mons5SQKf11g4EVEA). And don’t worry, unless you choose to remove your name from the start list, your spot will still be carried over to the 2021 Vermont 100 (July 16-18th, 2021).

Thank you and rock on

More than ever, we look forward to seeing you at Silver Hill for the 2021 Vermont 100! Until then, stay safe and be well!

–  Amy Rusiecki and the Vermont 100 Race Committee

« Back to all posts
Drop Bag Instructions for Your VT100

Drop Bag Instructions for Your VT100

You’ve got questions. We’ve got answers! So let’s jump into some VT100 drop bag instructions.

Here’s What You NEED to Know About Drop Bags at the VT100 

We cover basic drop bag instructions, which aid stations drop bags can be sent to, an FAQ you may be wondering about when it comes to Camp Ten Bear, and a courtesy reminder for how you can help our volunteers have a great day too. Further details are also located in: The Runner’s Handbook.


The Basics

  • How many drop bags: Runners and their pacers are permitted to have one (1) drop bag per aid station that allows crews. See the aid stations lists below for 100-milers and 100-km runners.  
  • Who: While we do allow any runner to have a drop bag, we request that runners with crews not use drop bags (unless your crew won’t be at an aid station).  We have a ton of solo runners, and don’t want the volunteers to get bogged down with bags that your crew will ultimately pull and use for you!
  • Size: Drop bags should be soft sided, waterproof and durable. A small backpack or gear bag about 9” by 9” by 16” (or smaller) should be sufficient. See below for an example of what NOT to do.
  • Timing: Drop bags must be in place on Silver Hill by 4:15pm on Friday. Unfortunately we can not accommodate runners who are postponed (even by emergencies or travel delays). If you arrive late, you will have to do without your drop bags. We will do our best to return all drop bags to Silver Hill by 12 noon on Sunday. Please don’t forget to pick them up, because the RD stinks at mailing them back!  If you are unable to pick them up yourself, arrange for a friend or fellow runner to grab them for you.

The Details

  • Every drop bag must be marked clearly and largely with: Bib Number, Last Name, and Aid Station Name.
  • Bib Number: Your bib number will be posted on the entrants list page. If you don’t write your bib number clearly, your bag will be harder to find during the race.
  • Aid Station Name: If you don’t write the Aid Station Name clearly, your bag will be harder to find during the race.

100 Mile runners can send drop bags to the following Aid Stations:

  • Pretty House – mile 21
  • Stage Road – mile 30
  • Camp Ten Bear #1 – mile 47
  • Margaritaville – mile 58
  • Camp Ten Bear #2 – mile 69
  • Spirit of 76  – mile 76
  • Bill’s – mile 88
  • Polly’s – mile 96

100-km runners can send drop bags to the following Aid Stations:

  • Camp Ten Bear #1 – mile 9
  • Margaritaville – mile 20
  • Camp Ten Bear #2 – mile 31
  • Spirit of 76 – mile 38
  • Bill’s – mile 50
  • Polly’s – mile 58

An FAQ to Consider

Q. How should I mark my drop bags for Camp Ten Bear?

Since runners pass through twice, Camp Ten Bear is aid station #11 and aid station #17. There will be 2 drop bag areas; one area for #11, and one area for #17. If you want to use one drop bag for both areas, clearly mark the drop bag “Camp Ten Bear #11.” After you use the drop bag on your first time through Camp Ten Bear, drop the bag in the #17 pile before you leave and the bag will be there when you return.


Please Remember

Drop Bag - How NOT to PackAt the end of the day, The Vermont 100 is not responsible for lost, stolen or damaged bags or belongings.

Volunteers move upwards of 150 bags to each station and we do our best to do this carefully and with your best race in mind.

Pack appropriately! We can not accept unreasonably large or unwieldy drop bags. The more stuff you cram into your drop bag, the more valuable time you’ll lose rummaging through it to find what you need. The image to the right is in fact a real thing that happened. One time we got luggage… don’t do this to our volunteers!

Keep in mind that we won’t ship aid station bags that are left behind.  If you are leaving prior to it’s return, arrange with a fellow runner or friend to grab it for you.


Thank so much and looking forward to helping you do your best on race day!

-The VT100 Volunteers

PS – Want to know more about prepping for your VT100? Check out our quick post for Your VT100 Weekend Checklist.

« Back to all posts
Gas. Food. Ice – Where to Buy It Along the VT100 Race Route

Gas. Food. Ice – Where to Buy It Along the VT100 Race Route

Crews listen up especially: You’re gonna need gas. You’re gonna get hungry. You’re gonna want to cool some things off. So we’re here to help you!

Find the best spots along the VT100 race route to locate fuel, food, and ice.


About Each Location

PLEASE NOTE*
The following 8 outlets are directly on the Handler routes, and the basic information has been included in their written directions.

South Woodstock Country Store

  • Address: 10673 South Rd. Woodstock
  • Owner: Simarin
  • Good for: Excellent short order breakfast items, and great lunch offerings. Ice, drinks, snacks.
  • Hours:
    Fri. 6:30 am to 6:00 pm.
    Sat. 6:30 am to 6:00 p.m.
    Sun. 7:00 am.- 4:00 p.m.
  • Phone: 802-457-3050

Mac’s Market

  • Address: 37 Pleasant St. (Rte. 4) Woodstock
  • Manager: Jeff
  • Good for: Deli and full line of groceries. Are geared up for the event, with extra ice, etc..
  • Hours:
    Opens 7 am every day.
    Closing Mon. – Sat. 9:00 p.m.; Sun 8:00 p.m.
  • Phone: 802-457-9320

Maplefields

  • Address: 66 Pleasant St. (Rte. 4) Woodstock
  • Manager: Raphael
  • Good for: Stocking up for the event weekend.
  • Hours: Daily 5:00am to midnight
  • Phone: 802-457-1549

Cumberland Farms

  • Address: 433 Woodstock Road, Woodstock
  • Good for: getting gas and other race weekend supplies.
  • Hours: Daily 4:00am to midnight

Teago General Store

  • Address: At split between Pomfret Rd. and Stage Rd., Pomfret
  • Owner: Kathleen
  • Good for: Has Ice – Will have breakfast sandwiches, muffins, zucchini & banana breads – Midday Sandwiches. Geared up for the event.
  • Hours: Opens at 6:30am on Saturday (just for us!)
  • Phone: 802-457-1626

Watroba’s General Store

  • Address: 821 Rte. 106 Reading
  • Owners: Robert and Zonia
  • Good for: Ice, deli, produce, fruit, drinks.
  • Hours:
    Fri. & Sat. 7 am to 8 pm (Deli 9 am to at least 6:30 pm)
    Sun. 8 am to 6 pm. (Deli 9 am to 5:00 pm)
    Sandwich board out front: “VT-100 Supporters”
  • Phone: 802-484-7700

Downer’s Corner Store (Jiffy Mart)

  • Address: Junction of Rte’s 106 & 131, Weathersfield
  • Manager:  Steve and Missy
  • Good for: Gas (has diesel), Ice, Convenience items. 802-263-9327
  • Hours: 6 am to 9 pm (pumps close then). Deli – 6 am to 4:30 pm.

Villagers

  • Address: 4261 Rte. 106, Perkinsville (across from Downers)
  • Good for: Burgers, Fries, etc.
  • Hours:
    Tues. to Sunday 11:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
    Fri, & Sat. to 9:00 p.m.
    *Grill closes ½ hour before closing.
  • Phone: 802-263-5677

Windsor Establishments

Brownsville Butcher & Pantry (formerly Brownsville General Store)

  • Address: 871 VT-44, West Windsor
  • Good for: breakfast food, burgers and sandwiches, veggie options, wine by the glass, beer & ale on tap (and all your other weekend needs)
  • Hours: Monday – Friday – 6:30am to 8:00pm, Saturday 5:00pm to 10:00pm (just for us!), Sunday 7:00am to 6:00pm

Price Chopper

  • Address: Rte 5 (Main St.) Windsor
  • Good for: Groceries & Ice
  • Hours: 7 am to 11 pm

Windsor Diner

  • Address: Rte 5 (Main St.) Windsor
  • Owner: Theresa
  • Good for:
    Serving full breakfast including muffins
    Great fried chicken dinner
    Will make sandwiches for pick-up; may deliver if large enough order.
  • Hours: Every day – 7 am to 3:30pm
  • Phone: 802-674-5555

Cumberland Farms

  • Address: Main St.
  • Manager: Nina
  • Good for: Convenience Store fare, gas, ice
  • Hours: Open 24 hours

Pizza Chef

  • Address: 88 Main St.
  • Owners: Gus & Nickos
  • Good for: Pizza, plus will deliver if large enough order. Also have sandwiches.
  • Phone: 802-674-6861
  • Hours: Officially open daily at 11:00 am, but usually someone there by 9:00 to take orders. Close at 9pm.

Boston Dreams

  • Address: Corner of Main & State St’s
  • Owner: Karen
  • Good for: Specialty Coffees, sandwiches (Panini’s), ice cream, pastries, muffins. Have Wi-Fi. Full espresso bar. Both sit-down & take-out.
  • Hours: Opens every day at 7:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
  • Phone: 802-230-4107

Others Off of I-91 on Route 5 South:, before Center of Windsor

Harpoon Brewery Riverbend Taps & Beer Garden

  • Address: 336 Ruth Carney Drive, Windsor.  (2.8 miles north of Windsor town center on Rte. 5 North; 1.2 mi. south of I-91 Exit 9 on Rte. 5 South.)
  • Good for:
    Serving really good Pub fare food until 1 hour before closing time.  Wings, Fries, Salads, Wraps, Sandwiches & Burgers, etc.
  • Go to: www.HarpoonBrewery.com for complete menu and other info.
  • Hours:
    Open Thur.-Sun. 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
    Mon. to Weds. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Frazer’s Place (small drive-in restaurant)

  • Address: 2066 Rte 5., Windsor (halfway between Harpoon and center of town)
  • Owner: Mike
  • Hours:
    Mon. – Fri. 6:00 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.
    Sat & Sun. 7:00 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

The following are along routes for arriving at Silver Hill

If coming from the south on I-91, taking exit 8, and then Rte. 5 North, To:

Sunoco Station

  • Address: 258 Vt. Rte. 131, Ascutney, VT
  • Hours
    5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., but their pumps, including DIESEL, are open 24 hours.

Ascutney Market

  • Address: Rte. 5, Ascutney
  • Hours: daily 7:00am to 7:00pm

If coming from the north on I-89, taking exit 1 to Rte. 4 West

Mobil Gas Station

  • Address: 3479 Woodstock Rd. (Rte. 4) Quechee, VT
  • Hours: daily 5:30 a.m. – 10:30 p.m. (has diesel)

Quechee Jiffy Mart

  • Address: 6800 Woodstock Rd. Quechee, VT
  • Hours:
    Gas: 6:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m./11:00 p.m. Sat.
    Subway Shop 7:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.
    Gas pumps off at closing

Taftsville Country Store

  • Address: 2706 E. Woodstock Rd. Taftsville, VT, near Taftsville Covered Bridge
  • Phone: 802-457-1135.
  • Hours:
    Mon – Thu. 9:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
    Fri. & Sat. 8:00 a.m. – 6::00 p.m.
    Sun. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

If coming from the north on I-91, taking Exit 9 onto Rte. 5 North

Mike’s Store

  • Address: 148 Rte. 5, Hartland
  • Good for: Gas (HAVE DIESEL), Ice, Groceries, sandwiches.
  • Hours: 6 am to 9 pm – 7 days
  • Phone: 802-436-3244

Hartland Diner

  • Address: Hartland 3 Corners
  • Owner: Nicole
  • Good for: Great food.
  • Hours: 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday – Friday, open 6:00am on Sunday.
    Opening special for us on Saturday at 4:00 am (awesome breakfast menu)
  • Phone: 802-436-3663

BG’s Market

  • Address: (Next door to Diner)
  • Owner: Bill
  • Good for: Deli, Snacks, Groceries.
  • Hours:
    Fri. & Sat. 6 am to 8 pm.
    Sun. 6 am to 7 pm.
    Phone: 802-436-2360
« Back to all posts
Volunteering at the VT100 – What To Know

Volunteering at the VT100 – What To Know

Welcome to the VT100 blog post that covers most everything you’d need to know about volunteering at the VT100 – from the duties and perks available, to what to download to be prepared, and even a little bit on our volunteer recognition awards

Oh, and we don’t want to wait till the end to say it, so before we dive in, please know how much we appreciate all of our amazing VT100 volunteers! Without your help, our event would never be the success it is year after year. Not only is volunteering is a great way to give back to the running community, but it’s also an excellent way to learn about a race before running it.


New Volunteers

Not sure what to help with? We also have a general volunteer sign up form here, where you can share a bit more about yourself and we’ll help find a duty, day, and time that will work for both of us.


Tell Me About the Perks!

VT100 volunteers all get sweet VT100 t-shirts (as long as you volunteer at least 5 hours), tons of high fives, a boat load of thank yous, and more self-satisfaction for giving back than you could shake a stick at.

In order to guarantee your volunteer t-shirt size: You need to sign up by May 14th. We will do our best to get enough shirts and the correct sizes for everyone who signs up after May 14th.

We need over 500 volunteers to pull this off. Don’t hesitate: sign-up today!


Volunteer Opportunities Include

  • Packing food boxes days before the race
  • Setting up aid stations (Friday night)
  • Setting up the start/finish (Thursday, Friday)
  • Serving food and good cheer at aid stations (Saturday – Sunday)
  • Checking the runners in at the finish (Saturday – Sunday)
  • Cleaning up after the awards ceremony (Sunday night)
  • Amateur HAM radio operators (Saturday – Sunday)

KEEP READING, THERE’S MORE BELOW!

VT100 - Volunteering

Pro-tips from the Volunteer Coordinators

Download and read the following documents prior to arrival. Cell service on Silver Hill Meadow is spotty at best and there will NOT be copies available at check-in.

Remember to pack:

  • Reusable water bottle or cup (VT100 is a cupless race)
  • Flashlight and/or headlamp
  • Bug Spray
  • Rain gear
  • Sunblock and Hat

If you have received a volunteer assignment but would like to do more, please contact us with your available days.

Camping spots are still available at the Start/Finish on Silver Hill Meadow.


Got Questions? We’ve Got Answers!

Send us an email and we’ll do our best to answer as soon as possible.

Thank you!

Carolyn Stocker
Vermont 100 Volunteer Coordinator
vt100volunteers@gmail.com

 

« Back to all posts
What’d You Think of the 2017 VT100? Take the Post Race Survey Today

What’d You Think of the 2017 VT100? Take the Post Race Survey Today

Thank you ALL for attending our 29th annual Vermont 100 Endurance Run or Ride!

Whether you were a runner, a crew person, a family support member, a volunteer, a HAM radio operator, a horse rider, a horse crew person, veterinarian, medical staff… you get the picture… we want to hear from you!

Your opinions will help us improve the 30th annual and on into the future of this race.

It should only take a few minutes of your time and we really value your thoughts on how we did things.

Please share this link with anyone you might know that was involved with the race.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VT100

Thanks, and hope to see you all again next year.

– Amy and the Race Committee

« Back to all posts
*Blind Dates at the VT100 – Pacing/Being Paced by a Stranger

*Blind Dates at the VT100 – Pacing/Being Paced by a Stranger

Some runners don’t have the ability to travel with pacers, so they rely on the generosity of strangers to pace them.

Are you a pacer seeking a runner or runner seeking a pacer to help you at the VT100?

Well, you’re in luck – no need to ‘swipe right’ – just click the links below, enter your credentials, and you’ll meet your match in the twilight on Silver Hill… *sorta like a blind date for runners! 


HERE’S HOW IT WORKS

You sign up through the form links above, then we do our best to make the match! If we find someone, we’ll get you synced up on Silver Hill on the Friday evening before the race.

Then following your initial introductions, you’ll both have a few hours to prepare for your first date, which begins after the runner’s second pass through the Camp Ten Bear aid station (~mile 31 for 100k, and ~mile 70 for 100m).

Runners, when you’re with your pacer during the race, your job is simple:

Run. And don’t let your pacer mule; you’re better than that… and it’ll get your DQ’d.

Pacers, once the race starts, you’ve got a bit more responsibility as your runner’s blind date: 

You will be responsible for keeping your runner on their target pace, on the correct trail, and regularly hydrating and refueling. However, don’t let the romance blossom too soon! Absolutely no physical aid may be given to your date. No matter how cute they are, you must not carry their food, fluids, or supplies of any kind. Muling is not a good look, and will disqualify your runner.


WHAT DOES THE IDEAL PACER LOOK LIKE? 

Think you’ve got what it takes to be a rockstar pacer at the VT100? Here’s what your blind date would love:

You should be cute an experienced runner, healthy, in good shape and conditioned adequately to run 30 miles over rough terrain.

It’s likely that your date will last overnight and into the wee hours of the early morning (no, not like that!); so you should be dressed accordingly, equipped with flashlights or a headlamp, and familiar with the distance between aid stations (pro-tip: pack an aid station cheat sheet and study the race profile! All of this can be found in our handy Resource Center).

Oh, and don’t forget, you can partake at aid stations and even have your own drop bags, but remember – you’re a cheap blind date; should also be adequately supplied with your own food and water at all times too.

Now go get ’em! If your date doesn’t have you swooning by sunrise, the finish line on Silver Hill will do the trick. And remember, while you won’t get any recognition for being a blind date at the VT100, your dating karma might and your running karma certainly will.


*Editor’s note: It should be fairly obvious, but pacing or being paced at the VT100 is not a romantic date. It’s a serious responsibility for those who are seriously interested in helping or being helped by someone to complete the race.

« Back to all posts
A Note From the Medical Director

A Note From the Medical Director

One of the qualities that makes a good ultrarunner is stubbornness. However, this trait can also be a liability. It is critically important to be able to distinguish between when you should tough it out, and when you need to stop. That’s why we have skilled and knowledgeable medical professionals at the VT100 to help save us from ourselves when we truly need it.

The major addition this year is the Medical Director’s decision to immediately disqualify runners that exhibit signs of significant Rhabdomyolysis and Trench Foot. Once these conditions have developed, any further running or exposure to the elements can be life or limb threatening, even in the early stages of severity.


Here’s what the VT100 Medical Director, Dr. Rick Marasa, and his experienced team will be looking for:

Rhabdomyolysis

  • Rhabdo is muscle tissue breakdown resulting in the release of a protein into the blood that can damage the kidneys.
  • Symptoms include dark, reddish urine, a decreased amount of urine, weakness, and muscle aches.
  • Early treatment with aggressive fluid replacement reduces the risk of kidney damage.
  • The recovery can take several months and is a bigger problem in runners who have exerted themselves beyond their level of training.
  • Urine dipstick testing strongly for blood will be available (and used, as needed) at the VT100 stations with medical providers.  
  • Since there is no direct correlation of weight loss to Rhabdo or hydration/circulation status, VT100 medics will conduct urine tests only when clinically indicated.  

Trench Foot

  • Trench Foot is severe pain in the feet that is associated with prolonged exposure to wet/cool environments.
  • The feet might show only minimal physical redness or blanching.
  • Much like its “cousin” frostbite, re-exposure can result in severe symptoms, tissue damage (blisters, open sores, fungal infections, etc.) and even necrosis (cellular death).
  • As trench foot worsens, feet may also begin to swell.
  • Trench foot can be prevented by keeping the feet clean and dry. Runners should change out of wet, dirty socks and shoes, and into clean, dry pairs.
  • VT100 medics will be asking runners about foot pain only when clinically indicated.

“Both of these conditions are essentially silent killers. When runners try tough it out and overcome them, they put themselves at a very high risk of increasing the severity to life and limb threatening levels.”

– Dr. Marasa

All runners must follow the direction of the Medical Director and his experienced, knowledgeable team. Your longevity in this wacky sport depends on it!


Remember: Although medical personnel will assist you when possible, you are ultimately responsible for your own well-being. Monitor yourself and prepare to drop out at the nearest aid station if you don’t feel well.  As you run, be aware of the number of miles to the next aid station.  There’s no shame in knowing your limitations. Several drops have come back to finish (or win) the VT100 the following year.

« Back to all posts
FAQs – Zeke’s Answers to All Your VT100 Questions

FAQs – Zeke’s Answers to All Your VT100 Questions

We get A LOT of questions from our participants every year. So, we’ve rounded up your FAQs and Zeke’s taken the time to answer each. There’s a ton of information here, but we promise it’s worth it. Enjoy!

  • This post is broken up into 11 sections.
  • Read start to finish, or click a topic to anchor to that specific section
  1. About Zeke
  2. The Course
  3. Your Gear
  4. Aid Stations
  5. Medical
  6. The Start and Finish
  7. The Schedule
  8. Running with Horses
  9. Weather
  10. Pacers, Crews, & Handlers
  11. Miscellaneous

We hope this will help you breathe a little easier going into the race!


About Zeke

If you have questions about the VT100, Zeke has answers. As a longtime member of the race committee for the VT50 and the VT100, Zeke Zucker is here to make sure you have the best experience possible.

Zeke is an experienced runner, having finished over 50 ultras in his career, including six Vermont 100 finishes, Western States 100, Leadville 100, Wasatch 100, Mountain Masochist, and Bull Run Run.

As a critical member of our race committee, Zeke ensures that the course is the correct length. As landowner permissions change, he coordinates substitutions and re-routes. He also checks the course to make sure that there aren’t any downed trees or other obstacles along the route.

And as if his rockstar status couldn’t be more solid, Zeke was the captain of the Spirit of ‘76 aid station for many years, before recently turning the reigns over to the 413 Trail Runners. He still volunteers there every year, so make sure you say hello when you pass through!

So, if you’ve got any questions – from how to prepare for your first 100 miler, your first Vermont, what the course is like, or what your crew should expect – Zeke has experienced it all and is super generous to share his wealth of knowledge.


The Course

WHERE CAN I FIND A MAP OF THE COURSE?
We do not publish course maps because most of the VT100 is on private land. We deeply respect our landowners privacy and are very thankful they generously grant us access to run on their land. Without these landowners, the VT100 would not be possible. Thank you, landowners!

WHAT IS THE COURSE LIKE?
Course Composition:

Gravel / Trail – Jeep road / Paved
100 Mile: 68.5% / 29% / 2.5%
100-km: 66.5% / 32% / 1.5%

Composition Details:

The 70 miles of smooth gravel roads, although hilly, are very runnable. The trails and jeep roads, for the most part, are also quite runnable, with a paucity of rocks or roots. Most trails are part of the local Horse Association trail network, and are well-maintained.

The Jeep Roads are hardly rutted, but occasionally a heavy rain will cause some erosion. One segment, just before the halfway point, is an old logging road with sizeable puddles that extend across the width of the road. Since your feet might get wet, you may want to include a pair of dry shoes and socks at the next drop bag aid station, which is Margaritaville at mile 58.5.

The total paved surface is about 2.5 miles. There are 6 sections of paved surfaces ranging between 1/16 and 1/2 mile. The longest paved surface is just shy of 1 mile and occurs after Lillian’s at mile 43.

VT100 Course

ARE THERE A LOT OF HILLS? 

There are hills throughout the course. The elevation again is approximately 17,000’ for the 100 Mile and 9,000’ for the 100 Km.

Vermont 100-mile Elevation Profile

Here are the hills that will get your attention:

  • Mile 4: Densmore Hill Road, moderate for 2 miles
  • Miles 10-16 & 19-21: Moderate rollers before Pretty House
  • Mile 26: moderate climb up to Sound of Music Hill
  • Mile 30: After Stage Rd. 3/4 mi. up thru meadow and woods. Steep then Mod.
  • Mile 38: Fletcher Hill Road, 1.5 miles of steep road

NOTE: 100K runners: you have one half mile moderate hill at 3.2 miles. For the following, subtract 38 miles or your mileage points. You can also access the 100-km elevation profile here

  • Mile 49: Agony Hill, moderate to steep for 7-10 miles
  • Mile 56: Tracer Brook up to Margaritaville aid station, moderate to steep for 2 miles
  • Mile 59: Prospect Hill, steep for half mile
  • Mile 62: Brown Schoolhouse Road, moderate climbs for 3 miles
  • Mile 70: Heartbreak Hill, steep for 7-10 miles
  • Mile 74: Calendar Hill Road, moderate to steep climb for half mile
  • Mile 76: Driveway approach to ’76 aid station, 0.15 mi. and very steep
  • Mile 87: Coon Club Road before Bill’s, moderate to steep roller coaster
  • Mile 90: Hewett Road, moderate 1.5 miles, then Hunt Road 0.3 steep
  • Mile 92: Marton Road, first third is VERY STEEP, then eases to moderate half mile
  • Mile 98: Trails before Blood Hill are short, mostly moderate with one steep

ARE THE TRAIL SECTIONS ROCKY?
For the most part, no. There will be some roots, small rocks and ruts, so pay attention and pick up your feet. We have driven or run all of the trails and cut downed trees and tossed limbs and branches, but some can fall the evening before or the day of.

HOW WILL THE COURSE BE MARKED?
The 100 mile course will be marked with large yellow plastic dinner plates, with bold dark black arrows indicating direction (right, left or straight). Where the course turns, there will be one arrow plate BEFORE the turn, two plates at the turn, and another plate AFTER the turn. On some stretches you will see confidence plates with a large C on it, to assure you that you are still on course. The 100K will be marked with LAVENDER plastic dinner plates only until it joins the 100 Mile course (at Lillian’s Aid Station), at which point everyone will follow yellow plates. At night, in addition to the plates, there will be green glow stick chem-lites marking the route.

VT100 - Yellow Course Markers

HOW MUCH DOES THE 100-KM COURSE OVERLAP THE 100-MILE?
The 100 K course starts at Silver Hill Meadow and proceeds 5.6 miles to Lillian’s Aid Station, which is the mile 43.3 for the 100 Milers. From Lillian’s to the finish, the two courses are identical.

WHERE DO THE COURSES GO?
The 100 Mile goes through parts of 9 towns in a three lobe cloverleaf pattern. The 100 K goes through parts of 6 towns on the latter two cloverleaf ‘lobes’.

HAVE THERE BEEN ANY COURSE CHANGES?
There are no anticipated changes to the course this year, however minor last minute changes seem to occur every year. Any course changes will be reviewed at the pre-race briefing on Friday.


Your Gear

CAN I USE DROP BAGS?
You can have a drop bag at any aid station that allows crews. Information about drop bags can be found here. Remember:

  • All drop bags bags must be in place on Silver Hill by 5:30pm on Friday, July 14th.
  • Mark each drop bag with your: Bib Number,  Last Name, and Aid Station Name.
  • Drop bags should be soft sided, waterproof and durable. A small backpack or gear bag about 9” by 9” by 16” (or smaller). We will not accept unreasonably large drop bags.

HOW SHOULD I MARK MY DROP BAGS FOR CAMP TEN BEAR?
Since runners pass through twice, Camp Ten Bear is aid station #11 and aid station #17. There will be 2 drop bag areas; one area for #11, and one area for #17. If you want to use one drop bag for both areas, clearly mark the drop bag “Camp Ten Bear #11.” After you use the drop bag on your first time through Camp Ten Bear, drop the bag in the #17 pile before you leave and the bag will be there when you return.

WHAT SHOULD I BRING?
The VT100 is a cupless race, so bring a water bottle. The race starts before sunrise, so bring a headlamp or flashlight. We suggest you wear trail shoes but you could get by with road shoes.

SHOULD I TAKE A FLASHLIGHT FOR THE START OF THE 100-MILE RACE?
Since the 100 mile starts before sunrise, you may want to bring a small inexpensive light that you can afford to leave behind at the first aid station. There will be a box at the first aid station (Densmore Hill, mile 7) where you can leave your light. The box will be returned to Silver Hill.

SHOULD I CARRY TWO WATER BOTTLES FOR THE RACE?
Yes, if the weather is above 85 degrees and you anticipate taking over 28 hours to complete the run. You won’t need two bottles if you have a hydration pack. The greatest distance between aid stations is 5 miles, which occurs 3 times in the 100 mile. Slower runners will take close to 1.5 hours to cover 5 miles.


Aid Stations

WHAT KIND OF HYDRATION AND FUEL WILL BE PROVIDED AT THE AID STATIONS?
New this year, the energy drink that will be provided at aid stations is Base Performance Hydro.  All runners will also be given a tube of the Base Performance Electrolytes, to use in conjunction with the Hydro.  If you plan on using these products, it is strongly suggested that you order and try both in your training. Aid Stations will also have an assortment of the following: chips, fruit, M&M’s, cookies, candy, peanut butter and jelly, turkey sandwiches, and potato chunks. There will be soup, broth, coffee, tea, and hot chocolate at some stations after dark. There will be burgers and hotdogs at Camp Ten Bear, and grilled cheese and chicken noodle soup at Spirit of ’76.

CAN I GET ENERGY GELS AT THE AID STATIONS?
Normally, no. When using your own gels, please hold the wrappers and dispose of them at the next aid station. Do not discard on the roads or trails. Absolutely no littering will be tolerated. We pride ourselves on being Green. After all, Vermont is the Green Mountain State!


Medical

WHAT IF I NEED FIRST AID OR MEDICAL ATTENTION?
The main medical center is inside the tent on Silver Hill. Minor aid can be obtained along the course at the handler stations if an EMT is present. All of manned aid stations will have basic first aid kits and electrolyte caplets. We have HAM Radio communication at all handler stations in order to connect injured runners with medical personnel.

ARE THERE MANDATORY MEDICAL CHECKS?
Yes, at Camp Ten Bear (miles 47 and 70) and at Bill’s (mile 88). At these checkpoints, every runner must check in with medical staff to undergo a brief evaluation that may include being weighed or otherwise evaluated. All decisions and evaluations are up to the medical staff.

FOR WHAT REASON(S) WOULD THE MEDICAL PERSONNEL STOP ME FROM RUNNING?
Medical staff will be monitoring for significant weight loss, weight gain, trench foot, Rhabdomyolysis, and Heat Stroke/Hyperthermia.


The Start and Finish

WHEN DO THE RACES START?

  • The 100 mile starts at 4:00 a.m. Saturday.
  • The 100 K starts at 9:00 a.m. Saturday.

WHAT ARE THE CUT-OFF TIMES? 

  • The 100 mile cut-off time is 10:00 a.m. on Sunday.
  • The 100 K cut-off time is 5:00 a.m. on Sunday.

WHEN WILL THE WINNERS FINISH? 

  • For the 100 mile, the first male will finish in about 15.5 hrs (around 7:30 p.m.) and the first female in about 17.5 hrs (9:30 p.m.).
  • For the 100 K, the first male will finish in about 9.5 hrs (6:30 p.m.) and the first female in about 11.5 hrs (8:30 p.m.).

WHERE EXACTLY IS THE START?
The races start slightly downhill from the main tent on Silver Hill Meadow, under the starting line banner. Both races proceed down the hill.

WHERE EXACTLY IS THE FINISH?
The finish line for both races is in the woods behind the main tent on Silver Hill Meadow.


The Schedule

WHEN AND WHERE WILL THE PRE-RACE BRIEFING BE HELD? 
4:30 p.m. Friday in the main tent on Silver Hill Meadow.

WHEN AND WHERE IS THE PASTA DINNER FRIDAY EVENING?
Immediately following the pre-race briefing. approx 5:00 p.m. Your Bib is YOUR MEAL TICKET! Family and friends and pacer meal tickets ARE NOT included in your entry fee. Extra meal tickets will be available at the Merchandise Table.

WHEN AND WHERE IS THE SUNDAY POST-RACE BBQ?
In the main tent at 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Your Bib is YOUR MEAL TICKET! Family and friends and pacer meal tickets ARE NOT included in your entry fee. Extra meal tickets will be available at the Merchandise Table.

WHEN ARE THE AWARDS?
Sunday at about 11 a.m., immediately following the post-race BBQ.


Running with Horses

WHAT SHOULD I KNOW ABOUT RUNNING WITH THE HORSES?
The horses will not run you over; they actually want to slow down to your pace. If a horse and rider want to pass you, speak with the rider and step aside if asked to. If you want to pass a horse, speak with the rider and wait until they says it’s okay. At night, in particular, talk to the rider as soon as you’re within earshot; until the horse knows you are a human, the horse may be frightened.  And above all, don’t point your bright flashlight towards horses – they like that even less than us runners do!

VT100 - Running with the Horses


Weather

WHAT TIME DOES THE SUN RISE AND SET?

  • Sunrise is approximately 5:26 a.m. Saturday and 5:27 a.m. Sunday.
  • The sun will set Saturday evening at approximately 8:25 p.m.

WHAT ARE THE AVERAGE TEMPS?
At night, it is usually in the 50’s, but could be in the 40’s or 60’s. During the day, it is usually in the 70’s, but could be in the 60’s, 80’s or 90’s.

WILL IT RAIN DURING THE RACE?
It could and has, but on average does not. We’ll give you the latest weather forecast at the pre-race briefing. Bring a raincoat and an extra set of shoes/socks just in case.


Pacers, Crews & Handlers

WHERE CAN I FIND A PACER?
You can request one in advance via the Pacer section on our website. On Friday at registration, look for John Bassette in the yellow West Point baseball cap. All pacers must get and wear a bib number during the race.

VT100 - Pacers

WHERE CAN I PROVIDE ASSISTANCE TO MY RUNNER?
Crews are allowed at handler access aid stations only. Helping your runner at non-handler access aid stations is NOT allowed and can be grounds for runner disqualification. There are 8 handler access aid stations for the 100 mile and 6 for the 100 K. It will take roughly 35 minutes for crews to drive from Silver Hill Meadow to the first crew access aid station. Please see the Handler Instructions for answers to the following common questions and more:

  • Where are the handler aid stations?
  • How do I get to Camp Ten Bear from Silver Hill?
  • Where can I park at the Handler access aid stations?

WHERE CAN I GET GAS, ICE, FOOD AND OTHER SUPPLIES?
There are a number of great, local country stores in the towns of South Woodstock, Taftsville, Hartland, Brownsville, Reading and Woodstock. For more information, see our blog post on local establishments.

WHAT WILL THE RACE OFFICIALS BE WEARING?
They will be wearing yellow t-shirts that say ‘Race Official.’


Miscellaneous

ARE THERE SHOWERS AVAILABLE POST-RACE?
There is one very rustic shower available in woods near the camping area on SilverHill. There is also a small pond for swimming.

WHAT IS VERMONT ADAPTIVE?
Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports, a non-profit, volunteer based organization which provides competitive and recreational athletic opportunities, equipment and instruction for people with disabilities. Your entry fee and all money raised during the event goes directly toward provision of these services.

WILL THERE BE ROAD CLOSURES?
Our race depends on our neighbors and gracious landowners! The local landowners are extremely tolerant of us every year. We have been asked to reduce traffic and noise around the race course. We absolutely must keep the noise down at Silver Hill Meadow and keep event-related vehicles off of some specific roads. In an effort to maintain good relations with the local community, there will be some clearly marked road closures. Violation of these closures could easily result in the termination of our event. In 2015, we revised the driving directions to Silver Hill and between authorized Handler Access Aid Stations. Please be aware and respectful of all road closures and help spread the word.


Still have questions? Visit the VT100 blog for more helpful information, or of course don’t hesitate to ask me!

-Zeke

« Back to all posts
Your Race Weekend Checklist

Your Race Weekend Checklist

There’s so much to do, know, and get ready for when it comes to arriving at Silver Hill on race day with a clear mind and ready to race. So, we want to arm you with a quick VT100 weekend checklist in hopes it’ll help you remember a couple key things! 


To Download

Download and read the following prior to arrival. Cell service on Silver Hill Meadow is spotty at best and there will NOT be copies available at check-in:

Additional “Important Race Forms & Links” available in our Resource Center.


About Drop Bags

Above all, be sure to fill and properly label Drop Bags with your bib number, last name, and the aid station name.


Remember to Pack 

  • Reusable water bottle or cup (VT100 is a cupless race!)
  • Flashlight and/or headlamp
  • Bug Spray for you and your crew
  • Rain gear
  • Sunblock and hat
  • Cash and credit cards, so you can buy race merch (personal and traveler’s checks are NOT accepted)

VT100 Light!

Don’t Forget to Bring

  • Your patience for other human beings.
  • Your cooperation in adhering to road closures and speed limits.
  • Your respect for the distance.
  • Your gratitude for the private landowners who make the VT100 possible.

See ya soon!

-The VT100 Race Committee

« Back to all posts
Athletes with Disability – Divisions & Rules

Athletes with Disability – Divisions & Rules

In 2017, the VT100 deepened our commitment to adaptive sports by becoming the first trail ultra ever to recognize mobility and visually impaired athletes in their own division: Athletes With Disabilities (AWD). 

This post will cover *everything you need to know about the AWD division, from entry criteria to division breakdown to racer and guide rules.

*If there is anything you feel we miss here, please contact us in the footer contact form that follows this post.


Criteria for AWD Entry

Criteria for entry into the 2018 VT 100 AWD category is as follows:

  • AWDs must be able to run the course
  • Tethers may be used for athletes with a visually impairment
  • Leg prosthetics may be used for amputees.
  • Crutches, braces, or poles may be used if indicated/necessary, with approval from the RD.
  • Since there are plenty of mucky Vermont trails on-course, it is not suitable for athletes in wheelchairs (see more on this below).
  • AWDs must be able to finish within the 30 hour cutoff (100 mile) or 20 hour cutoff (100km).

AWD Entry Process

AWDs will follow the same registration process as the general registration, and will register for the distance race they plan to run. If an AWD requires additional time to register (e.g. due to visual impairment), contact the RD for early registration.


AWD Division Breakdown

Based on International Paralympic Committee impairment descriptions, the VT 100 will *recognize two types of AWD based on clearly defined eligible impairments: Visually impaired and mobility impaired.

*Depending on number of AWDs registered, the VT100 may choose to group all AWDs within one division or recognize each division listed below individually:

1. VISUAL IMPAIRED DIVISION 

Individuals with vision impacted by an impairment of the eye structure, optical nerves or optical pathways, or the visual cortex, may be granted registration as an AWD but will not be allowed extended time on the course.

A couple things to note about our course for visually impaired athletes:

  • Course Markings: The Vermont 100 uses colored plates (yellow) to mark the course during the day and glow sticks (yellow) to mark the course at night. AWDs, with assistance from their guide as needed, must be able to follow the course as marked. Unfortunately, the Vermont 100 is not able make accommodations for athletes with visual impairments by altering the standard course markings.
  • Canines: In general, dogs aren’t allowed at Silver Hill or at other venues associated with the VT100 (aid stations, race course, etc.). If an athlete with a visual impairment requires a guide dog, please contact Race Director for permission to have the dog at Silver Hill and the aid stations. Again, only at the start/finish grounds and designated aid stations. Dogs will still not be allowed on the course.

2. MOBILITY IMPRAIRED DIVISION 

Individuals with permanent physical disabilities that affect their ability to walk/run, may be granted registration as an AWD but will not be allowed extended time on the course.

This includes:

  • Limb deficiency: Total or partial absence of bones or joints as a consequence of trauma (e.g. car accident), illness (e.g. bone cancer) or congenital limb deficiency (e.g. dysmelia).
  • Leg length difference: Bone shortening in one leg due to congenital deficiency or trauma.
  • Short stature: Reduced standing height due to abnormal dimensions of bones of upper and lower limbs or trunk, for example due to achondroplasia (dwarfism) or growth hormone dysfunction.

Unfortunately, due to course restrictions and safety concerns related to the trails of the VT100, this does not include:

  • *Athletes in wheelchairs and duo teams in hand cycles, push-rim cycles, or racing wheelchairs.

*All AWDs must be fully ambulatory, the use of any mechanical device will not be allowed.


Rules for AWDs and Guides

AWDs and their guide(s) will follow the same rules as all participants:

Start times, Course, and Time Limits

  • AWDs will start with the rest of the athletes for their race (4:00am. for 100 mile, 9:00am for 100km).
  • AWDs will run the same course as the rest of the athletes.
  • The course time limit is the same for AWDs as for all participants for their race (20 hours for 100km, 30 hours for 100 mile).

Guide Rules

  • Guides are expected to follow the same rules as all other pacers.
  • AWDs may be accompanied by one guide at a time to complete the VT 100. Accommodations may be made if an AWD requires more than one guide at a time.
  • Guide exchanges will take place at crew-accessible aid stations. Accommodations may be made for exchanges at other manned aid stations upon request.
  • Athletes are responsible for bringing their own guides to the race.
  • Guides are not official entrants in the VT100 and are not timed, scored, or listed in the official results. If a guide wants to be officially timed, scored and listed in results, they need to register as a VT100 participant including paying entry fees and qualifying for the event.
  • Guides participate free of charge, but must sign a waiver prior to participation.
  • Athlete and guide are regarded as a team and must be together at all times along the course.
  • Guides must wear a GUIDE bib on the front and back of their outermost layer, kept visible at all times.
  • Guides may not use a bicycle or other mechanical means of transport.
  • Guides cannot pull the athlete, or propel the athlete forward by pushing.
  • Guides cannot mule for the athlete, or run ahead to aid stations to fill water bottles or otherwise unfairly advantage their athlete.
  • Guides must adhere to the same standards as Pacers (see Runner Handbook for full rules)
  • Guide may have a drop bag, separate from their athletes drop bag, at aid stations that allow drop bags.
  • Guides are encouraged to attend the pre-race briefing on Friday at 4:15pm, however it is ultimately the AWD’s responsibility to attend the meeting and inform their crew and guides of all race rules/regulations.

Guide Responsibilities

  • Assure that drop bags (the guide’s’ and AWD’s) are placed in the correct corral in the staging area, immediately following the race briefing.
  • Work with AWDs to ensure safety of the AWD. This includes communication between the AWD and guide to stay out of the way (typically running on the side of the trail/road) when being approached from behind by horses, faster runners, or officials on the course in order to avoid collisions.

Looking Forward to a Tremendous Race

Thank you for taking the time to read this post and VT100 - AWDget familiar with our new AWD division. At the end of the day, it is our hope that in disallowing extra time to complete the race (as well as other accommodations), we’re providing an opportunity for all abilities to compete on equal ground.

We’re open to feedback and improvements, and encourage other Race Committees to accept this challenge as well.

See you at the start line!

-The VT100 Race Committee

« Back to all posts
Interviewing the VT100’s Camp Ten Bear Aid Station Captains

Interviewing the VT100’s Camp Ten Bear Aid Station Captains

A 4-Question Interview with the Camp Ten Bear Aid Station Captains

In this post, we chat with Carolyn Shreck and Josh Katzman. Carolyn and Josh of the TARC running club captain the Camp Ten Bear aid station, which plays a crucial role in supporting runners at both miles 47 and 70. This spot is known for being nearly half way to the finish and for where you can finally pick up your pacer.

Let’s see what they had to say!


Q. What are you responsible for at Ten Bear? How long have you been volunteering there? How did you get involved?

Carolyn Shreck: I’ve toed the start line three times at VT100. Ten Bear was, hands down, the most memorable aid station for me as a runner, so when I decided to volunteer I knew Ten Bear was where I wanted to be. In 2016, I shadowed Mike Silverman, Mark Kruger, and Josh doing anything that was needed. This year Mike, Surjeet Paintal &  I will be there with a team of awesome Trail Animals Running Club (TARC) volunteers to help runners accomplish their amazing goals.

Josh Katzman: I’d say that my role is mostly behind the scenes. I try to beat the drum to get as many people as we can to show up to make sure Ten Bear runs as smoothly as possible. Because it is used twice during the race, we’ve got nearly 24 hours we’ve got to cover!  I’ve been helping out in that capacity since 2015, but I have only been able to help out on site in 2016 because my family is usually on vacation during the VT100.  I’ve spent time at the aid station as a runner and crew though, and it really is the most energetic place in the race (except maybe the start and finish!).  In terms of getting involved, I blame Mark. It’s all his fault.


Q. Since runners pass through twice and it’s a crew access point, Ten Bear can be a pretty hectic aid station. How do you successfully keep the chaos in check? Is there a secret sauce to running a well organized aid station?

Carolyn: Runners, volunteers, and especially Crews all reported that the 2016 setup at Ten Bear was the most efficient ever. Mike Silverman and Mark Kruger reorganized traffic flow to a ‘one way’ and got permission from a landowner to use a nearby field for crew parking. These changes drastically cut down congestion and chaos. Some crews were initially a little resistant to not being able to drive through the aid station and park where they had in the past, but later agreed the new system worked well.

Josh: The absolute key is having people like Mike, Mark and Carolyn who have been running these events and aid stations at other events for a long time. Just like a race, you have to be unflappable. If issues come up, like parking, you just need to figure out a way to troubleshoot. Mike’s big win last year was talking to the farmer at the end of the road so that we could park cars in his hay field. That made a huge difference because parking is always so tight there. It’s also important to remember that this should all be fun. Because of the incredible team of people and the tons of experience they bring on both sides of the race, things definitely go well!


Q. What Camp Ten Bear aid station specific advice would you give to first time runners?

Carolyn: Runners have access to Drop Bags and Crews at Ten Bear. There is a lot of activity (and friends!) there that could add up to many minutes of wasted time if runners aren’t careful. I encourage runners to have a solid mental checklist as they come into Ten Bear of what they want to accomplish so they can efficiently get in and out without wasting time or forgetting anything. When I’m running into an Aid Station, I repeat the list in my head in the order I’m going to do things: “garbage” (dump empty wrappers), “water” (hand bottles to volunteer), “feet” (change socks, shoes and treat blisters), and, “restock” (grab what I need from my drop bag). After they have called out their bib number, I encourage runners to just shout out their needs  as they are running into Ten Bear, so volunteers can help them efficiently. Something like, “I have a drop bag, number 374,” or, “can someone please fill these with Tailwind,” or, “I need to see medical”. We want to help, please tell us what we can do to help make your race successful! And always, always, always thank the volunteers!

Josh: When you leave Ten Bear the first time, you’ve got a pretty tough road climb to get out of the aid station. Just remember, even though you will soon pass the halfway point after the first visit, you are going to need your quads for those last 30 miles. I think I went too hard between miles 50-70 and it forced me to drop at mile 92!  These miles will catch up to you if you aren’t mindful of the downhills, especially. When you leave Ten Bear the second time, you’ve got a pretty long trail uphill once you cross the street. Try to jog the flat out of the aid station, and know that in 4-6 minutes you’ll have a hill you can hike/recover on if you need.

In terms of getting through the aid station, I think you should look for ways to cool yourself down. In 2016, we had buckets of ice water that we sponged people off with. Get some of that on your neck/head! You have access to a lot of water and Tailwind on the course. You won’t have access to ice or sponge baths as much.

We’ve also got port-a-potties. Use them if you need! Drop bags will be on your left when you come in. There are a lot, so make sure your name and bib number are all on your bag really clearly and large. If you have a crew, tell them to pick up your drop bag before you arrive. If you are solo, write “SOLO” on your drop bag, just so we will know you’re on your own!  And it’s tempting, because Ten Bear has so much energy, but tell yourself that (aside from any acute issue that needs to be addressed), you will spend no more than 3 or 4 minutes when you visit.  If you know you get stressed out by a lot of movement/people moving around, plan on spending even less time at Ten Bear.

As for Medical advice, I dropped at mile 92, so I’m probably not the best person to ask. In those last 30 miles, any difficulty or challenge gets compounded exponentially. You’ve got to be honest with yourself about your status, otherwise you won’t be able to change anything.  And this year’s crew at Ten Bear is, probably, the most experienced and knowledgeable that we’ve had there, so use them if you have any questions or problems. And address chaffing/blister issues. We’ve got a full medical staff at Ten Bear. They’re awesome.

Mostly though, DON’T FORGET WHERE YOU GOING! If it’s your first time through, you LEAVE UP THE HILL!  If it’s your second time through, follow the direction of all the parked cars – you’ll leave the same way they do!  


Q. What aid station specific advice would you give to first time volunteers? What makes a good aid station volunteer?

Carolyn: Anyone can volunteer! You totally don’t have to be a runner, know anything about running, or have ever volunteered at anything ever before. You will be parking and checking in at the volunteer desk at the start/finish area and then be transported by shuttle to Ten Bear. When you arrive please find me, Mike, or Surjeet to check in so we can assign you to a location like parking, food prep, traffic control, or water. Once you’re at your station shadow a veteran volunteer to see what they are doing and especially how they approach and talk to runners. Bring a small bag of personal items you may need for the hours you will be there, sunscreen, sunglasses, hat, jacket, special foods, etc. Home baked goods are always the biggest hit at an aid station, so if you want to bring cookies, rice krispie treats, other baked good please do! Runners might even hug you for it, I know I have! Do not bring valuables you might have to leave unattended, make sure everything like cellphone and wallets can stay on you at all times! And lastly, as much as we all love them, please do not bring pets of any kind.

Josh: If you’re helping out for the first time, there are definitely some things you can do to help yourself out:

  • Water: Bring a lot of water and don’t forget to drink it!  It will get hot/humid and you will be exhausted.  
  • Food: Bring some of your own food. Yes, enjoying the fruits of an aid station is wonderful, but one does start to feel a bit “blah” after many hours of potato chips, M&M’s, and grilled cheese.
  • Sun Protection: If you use it, sunscreen would be huge.  As would a hat.
  • Comfortable shoes: You’ll be on your feet most of the time, so I find I actually prefer to have my running shoes on (and you never know when you may need to jog up the hill with a runner!), and always bring at least two pairs in case one gets wet during the day.
  • Don’t be concerned about: “not knowing what to do.” Most runners simply need someone to speak to, to vocalize their concerns/worries. Tell them they’re looking good, and that you are impressed by what they are doing/have done. If you want some specific troubleshooting knowledge, talk to the experienced volunteers before runners start arriving. They can definitely give you some ideas that you can start helping runners troubleshoot with if you want.  But if in doubt, get one of those “vets” or the medical team to help you with a runner.
  • And never forget: the best volunteers are those that make every single runner feel like he or she is the most important person in the world.  If you can help people feel like a rockstar, whether he/she is in first or last, that is the sort of positive emotion that will get them to the finish line.  If you can make each runner you see on the day feel this way, well, you will be the rockstar!

Finally, and totally selfishly, those volunteers that bring some awesome food to share with the other volunteers?  Yeah, they’re always super popular!


Now that you’ve heard from the captains 

Are you interested in volunteering to help out at the VT100? Check out our post that covers all you need to know about volunteering, including links to sign up.


*Note About Interviewing

*The VT100 is proud of all of the participants of our events, from the racers to volunteers to land owners who grant us access to their beautiful property to enjoy the weekend. So, we like to take time to feature some of these people and get an inside look at their perspective on the race and how they help make it thrive. If you know anyone who would make a good interviewee, please contact us in the form below and we’ll see what we can do! 

« Back to all posts
Know your VT100 aid stations

Know your VT100 aid stations

The BEST aid station competition can get hot and heavy at the VT100. Here are some highlights on who’s manning the spots.

Remember, these volunteers pour their all into this long day and at the end of the race we’re going to ask you who you thought was the absolute best. So, study up!

Pretty House (mile 21.3) – The Shenipsit Striders 

The Shenipsit Striders are a running club in northern central CT that enjoys being on the trails – whether trail running, snowshoe running, or orienteering. The Striders put on classic New England trail races such as the Nipmuck Marathon and Soapstone Trail Race. They have at least one runner competing, but as always, will be a great presence at the race with crewing and pacing duties. This club likes to have fun, and there is no doubt they will have a great theme and run an efficient aid station.

Stage Road (mile 30.3)

 

Route 12 (Mile 33.3) – The Western Mass Distance Project 

The Western Mass Distance Project is primarily a competitive road running club, based in Western MA, but has runners competing in trail running, mountain running, and snowshoe running. WMDP annually hosts a cross country race that is part of the USATF-NE series. The folks working the aid station will be crewing and pacing for their one runner after the aid station closes. We are sure they will have a great theme – these are the girls who ran around in ‘Team Amy’ shirts with pink feathers in their hair last year. The only thing they like better than running fast is having some fun (typically with a beverage in hand!)

Camp 10 Bear (47 & 69.4) – TARC

 

Lincoln Covered Bridge (mile 38.2) – Trail Monster Running

Trail Monster Running is a trail running group in southern Maine who are passionate about the trails and love to get dirty – whether trail running, snowshoe running, or competing in the National Wife Carrying Competition. They host numerous races, including the Pineland Farms Trail Running Festival (which is one of the best parties in New England!). They may only have a few runners competing in the 100 miler, but they will certainly bring a large and enthusiastic group to VT100. Their finish line party at the Pineland Farms races is legendary, they also have fun with some cowboy themed aid stations at that race – we anticipate they will have a great time and do a great theme at our race.

Birmingham’s Aid Station (mile 53.9) – Gil’s Athletic Club

Gil’s Athletic Club is a running club based on Topsham, MA, and beyond running, they have known to bike, swim, and drink plenty of beer. GAC puts on the popular Stone Cat races and a 6 Hour Trail race. As always, GAC will be at VT100 in huge numbers, to support the 6 GAC runners competing in the 100 miler. The Stone Cat races are named after a local beer (or maybe vice versa) – they are known to have the actual Stone Cat (someone in costume), as well as Stone Cat ale (and often other alcoholic options) at their races.

Margaritaville (Mile 58.5) – The Frozen Fins

The Frozen Fins from the Vermont Chapter of Parrotheads in Paradise, a Jimmy Buffett fan club, will be returning to run Margaritaville. This group has volunteered at an aid station since the beginning of the race! We hear they may have a Steel Pan group performing during some of the race. These guys have been voted BEST Aid Station a number of times and hope to repeat again this year. This is the aid station that set the bar for decorations, music, style & attitude!

Spirit of ’76 (Mile 76.2) – Zeke & the RWB Crew

Zeke and his red, white, and blue crew will be stepping up to bring you the best of Americana aid station food, drinks, and snack.

Bill’s (mile 88.3) –

 

Polly’s (mile 94.9) –  

Rob Mather will be organizing the folks from the Red Cross again to make you all feel welcome at Polly’s.

« Back to all posts